less-ismore:

Jeff Koons, by Ari Marcopoulos,1987.

  1. Camera: IF ,,
  2. Aperture: f/1.5172236068983
  3. Exposure: 1.2340986733596"
  4. Focal Length: 1mm

archiveofaffinities:

Tony Cragg, Three Modern Buildings, 1984

amazing

fyeahwomenartists:

Amanda Valdez
I Poison Myself, 2012

  1. Camera: Canon EOS 5D Mark II
  2. Aperture: f/5
  3. Exposure: 1/125th
  4. Focal Length: 100mm

Self Portrait of Robert Rauchenberg.

(Source: inneroptics)

mentaltimetraveller:

Heather Guertin

The longer I look at it the more impressive it becomes.

'Untitled' (ArtEverywhereUS) by greg allen

everyartisthasabday:

This is Sol LeWitt’s only 3D Wall Drawing. The story goes that he was invited to exhibit in Japan, but when he arrived, he was given 4 pegboard walls that he couldn’t alter. Typically he paints over a wall, so he had to come up with a new idea idea on the spot. That new idea was rolling 40,000 pieces of tissue paper and inserting them into the pegboard’s holes.

(Wall Drawing 38, 1970)

  1. Camera: LG Electronics VX-8550

mentaltimetraveller:

CHRISTOPHER WOOL

UNTITLED

mentaltimetraveller:

JOSE DÁVILA HOMAGE TO THE SQUARE, 2011

QuestionJust to let you know, the suspected Franz Klein is actually a Kazuo Shiraga. Most likely installed at the Fortuny museum in Venice. Answer

Thanks a lot! I had trouble finding the source, I’ll add your remark to the post! 

Is that a Franz Kline or a home made painting? Does it matter? 

augustcanary remarked:

Just to let you know, the suspected Franz Klein is actually a Kazuo Shiraga. Most likely installed at the Fortuny museum in Venice.


Thanks!

Here is more Kazuo Shiraga goodness.

Is that a Franz Kline or a home made painting? Does it matter? augustcanary remarked:

Just to let you know, the suspected Franz Klein is actually a Kazuo Shiraga. Most likely installed at the Fortuny museum in Venice.
Thanks! Here is more Kazuo Shiraga goodness.

(Source: research-development)

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC: The previous item in my once-a-week Koons-O-Rama looked at a racially-tinged ad that Jeff Koons appropriated, almost unchanged, into the world of 1980s high art. This week, here’s another ad where he’s done the same–sort of. (Click on my image to enlarge it.) The difference is that my earlier example is all ad, all the time; the only thing about it that says “art” is the fact that it was printed on canvas, and that it is hanging in the Whitney Museum in New York. This week, my image is still 100-per-cent ad: It really was designed by a bunch of advertising creatives, with the single goal of selling Nike shoes. But it also happens to look very, very much like late-1980s and early-90s art. Its juxtaposition of image and printed title reminds me of conceptual photos by Lynne Cohen and Lorna Simpson. The way it pairs professional sports and corporate culture, and underlines the racial dynamic in that pairing, could come straight from any of the most political artists of its era. Hans Haacke, anyone? And yet the ad is supposed to be–really was–an object in the thick of pop culture

Is the similarity just accidental, or did the ad’s original designers, probably trained in art school, know and admire the avant-garde and want to borrow from it? That would be as though Campbell’s, in 1962, had started to corrupt the type on their tomato-soup cans to make them look more like Warhols. Whatever the ad’s true genesis, Koons clearly spotted what looked like a feedback loop between high and low culture, complicating both. He then inserted himself into that loop. Warhol had always aspired to being a fine artist; he was surprised when his unsaleably radical art launched him into mass culture. Koons, Andy’s most notable heir, gave finding a place in pop culture–or pretending to find such a place–a central role in his high art. (JPMorgan Chase Art Collection, ©Jeff Koons)

The Daily Pic also appears at ArtnetNews.com. For a full survey of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

brucesterling:

*The Man Ray Estate final fire sale.  Everything must go.

MAN RAY

15 NOVEMBER 2014
SOTHEBY’S PARIS

Sotheby’s is honoured to announce the sale of nearly 400 works by Dada and Surrealist icon Man Ray on November 15 in Paris. The auction will be the largest and most important sale of works by the ground-breaking artist in nearly 20 years.

The collection, property of the Man Ray Trust, includes works in all media: Photographs, Paintings, Drawings, Objects, Jewellery, Chess and Film. This will be the very last opportunity to acquire works by Man Ray coming from the studio of the artist and the artist’s estate.

At the core of the sale is a group of over 250 vintage photographs ranging from portraiture and fashion photography, including solarisation and gauze effects, to Surrealist compositions and iconic Man Ray photographs such asMagnolia Flower (1926), Starfish (1928), Ostrich Egg (1944) andMathematical Object (1934).

Nicola’s Irises, Cy Twombly

1990

(Source: endlessarea)