Sympathy for the art gallery

Sep 17

everyartisthasabday:

This is Sol LeWitt’s only 3D Wall Drawing. The story goes that he was invited to exhibit in Japan, but when he arrived, he was given 4 pegboard walls that he couldn’t alter. Typically he paints over a wall, so he had to come up with a new idea idea on the spot. That new idea was rolling 40,000 pieces of tissue paper and inserting them into the pegboard’s holes.
(Wall Drawing 38, 1970)

everyartisthasabday:

This is Sol LeWitt’s only 3D Wall Drawing. The story goes that he was invited to exhibit in Japan, but when he arrived, he was given 4 pegboard walls that he couldn’t alter. Typically he paints over a wall, so he had to come up with a new idea idea on the spot. That new idea was rolling 40,000 pieces of tissue paper and inserting them into the pegboard’s holes.

(Wall Drawing 38, 1970)

(via massmoca)

Sep 15

mentaltimetraveller:

CHRISTOPHER WOOL
UNTITLED

mentaltimetraveller:

CHRISTOPHER WOOL

UNTITLED

mentaltimetraveller:

JOSE DÁVILA HOMAGE TO THE SQUARE, 2011

mentaltimetraveller:

JOSE DÁVILA HOMAGE TO THE SQUARE, 2011

Sep 11

augustcanary said: Just to let you know, the suspected Franz Klein is actually a Kazuo Shiraga. Most likely installed at the Fortuny museum in Venice.

Thanks a lot! I had trouble finding the source, I’ll add your remark to the post! 

Sep 09

Is that a Franz Kline or a home made painting? Does it matter? 

augustcanary remarked:

Just to let you know, the suspected Franz Klein is actually a Kazuo Shiraga. Most likely installed at the Fortuny museum in Venice.


Thanks!

Here is more Kazuo Shiraga goodness.

Is that a Franz Kline or a home made painting? Does it matter? augustcanary remarked:

Just to let you know, the suspected Franz Klein is actually a Kazuo Shiraga. Most likely installed at the Fortuny museum in Venice.
Thanks! Here is more Kazuo Shiraga goodness.

(Source: research-development, via standardgrey)

Sep 08

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC: The previous item in my once-a-week Koons-O-Rama looked at a racially-tinged ad that Jeff Koons appropriated, almost unchanged, into the world of 1980s high art. This week, here’s another ad where he’s done the same–sort of. (Click on my image to enlarge it.) The difference is that my earlier example is all ad, all the time; the only thing about it that says “art” is the fact that it was printed on canvas, and that it is hanging in the Whitney Museum in New York. This week, my image is still 100-per-cent ad: It really was designed by a bunch of advertising creatives, with the single goal of selling Nike shoes. But it also happens to look very, very much like late-1980s and early-90s art. Its juxtaposition of image and printed title reminds me of conceptual photos by Lynne Cohen and Lorna Simpson. The way it pairs professional sports and corporate culture, and underlines the racial dynamic in that pairing, could come straight from any of the most political artists of its era. Hans Haacke, anyone? And yet the ad is supposed to be–really was–an object in the thick of pop culture
Is the similarity just accidental, or did the ad’s original designers, probably trained in art school, know and admire the avant-garde and want to borrow from it? That would be as though Campbell’s, in 1962, had started to corrupt the type on their tomato-soup cans to make them look more like Warhols. Whatever the ad’s true genesis, Koons clearly spotted what looked like a feedback loop between high and low culture, complicating both. He then inserted himself into that loop. Warhol had always aspired to being a fine artist; he was surprised when his unsaleably radical art launched him into mass culture. Koons, Andy’s most notable heir, gave finding a place in pop culture–or pretending to find such a place–a central role in his high art.  (JPMorgan Chase Art Collection, ©Jeff Koons)
The Daily Pic also appears at ArtnetNews.com. For a full survey of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC: The previous item in my once-a-week Koons-O-Rama looked at a racially-tinged ad that Jeff Koons appropriated, almost unchanged, into the world of 1980s high art. This week, here’s another ad where he’s done the same–sort of. (Click on my image to enlarge it.) The difference is that my earlier example is all ad, all the time; the only thing about it that says “art” is the fact that it was printed on canvas, and that it is hanging in the Whitney Museum in New York. This week, my image is still 100-per-cent ad: It really was designed by a bunch of advertising creatives, with the single goal of selling Nike shoes. But it also happens to look very, very much like late-1980s and early-90s art. Its juxtaposition of image and printed title reminds me of conceptual photos by Lynne Cohen and Lorna Simpson. The way it pairs professional sports and corporate culture, and underlines the racial dynamic in that pairing, could come straight from any of the most political artists of its era. Hans Haacke, anyone? And yet the ad is supposed to be–really was–an object in the thick of pop culture

Is the similarity just accidental, or did the ad’s original designers, probably trained in art school, know and admire the avant-garde and want to borrow from it? That would be as though Campbell’s, in 1962, had started to corrupt the type on their tomato-soup cans to make them look more like Warhols. Whatever the ad’s true genesis, Koons clearly spotted what looked like a feedback loop between high and low culture, complicating both. He then inserted himself into that loop. Warhol had always aspired to being a fine artist; he was surprised when his unsaleably radical art launched him into mass culture. Koons, Andy’s most notable heir, gave finding a place in pop culture–or pretending to find such a place–a central role in his high art. (JPMorgan Chase Art Collection, ©Jeff Koons)

The Daily Pic also appears at ArtnetNews.com. For a full survey of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

[video]

Sep 05

Nicola’s Irises, Cy Twombly
1990

Nicola’s Irises, Cy Twombly

1990

(Source: endlessarea, via chadwys)

kiameku:

Zilvinas Kempinas
Double O

kiameku:

Zilvinas Kempinas
Double O

thomeyorker:

David Lynch around 1966, when he was an art student at the PAFA

thomeyorker:

David Lynch around 1966, when he was an art student at the PAFA

(via estherglassphife)

bombmagazine:

Genesis BREYER P-ORRIDGE, Mum & Dad, 1971, mixed media, 11 × 15”.

bombmagazine:

Genesis BREYER P-ORRIDGE, Mum & Dad, 1971, mixed media, 11 × 15”.

Sep 04

[video]

grupaok:

Ellsworth Kelly in his studio at Coenties Slip, New York, 1958

grupaok:

Ellsworth Kelly in his studio at Coenties Slip, New York, 1958

Aug 31

[video]

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