Sympathy for the art gallery

Apr 17

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC: Think yesterday’s Pic was strange? I’ll give you strange. I caught this new piece by Jordan Wolfson, titled “Female Figure”, yesterday at David Zwirner, a few days before the end of its run. “All” it is is a superbly crafted animatronic sculpture of a woman that dances for a few minutes as you watch, its every motion perfectly matching the motions of a real human being … with pole-dancing skills. (Click on the image to see her – sorry, it – move.) Most eerie of all – what makes it seem utterly alive – is the way its gaze locks with yours and then follows your eyes wherever you go in the room. You’re glad this femme fatale is tethered to her mirror (getting a woman to bipedal around in high heels is still beyond the reach of robotics, as it’s almost beyond the reach of flesh and blood) because if she were free to approach as she pleased, you’d have to take off running. (Note that perfect facial expressions are also beyond robotics, and Wolfson hides that fact by giving his figure a mask.)
Should most of the credit for this piece go to the engineers rather than the artist? Is it just a way-cool piece of tech? Sure – but remember that once upon a time, perspective was “just” a new technology, as were oil paints, but the first examples of their use count as landmark works of art.
I am also perfectly aware of the real and vital feminist issues that our android raises, and her ties to the cheesiest traditions of bad SciFi. But I’m afraid that I can’t keep all that in mind once her hips start swiveling. (Courtesy Jordan Wolfson, David Zwirner, New York, and Sadie Coles HQ, London)
The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC: Think yesterday’s Pic was strange? I’ll give you strange. I caught this new piece by Jordan Wolfson, titled “Female Figure”, yesterday at David Zwirner, a few days before the end of its run. “All” it is is a superbly crafted animatronic sculpture of a woman that dances for a few minutes as you watch, its every motion perfectly matching the motions of a real human being … with pole-dancing skills. (Click on the image to see her – sorry, it – move.) Most eerie of all – what makes it seem utterly alive – is the way its gaze locks with yours and then follows your eyes wherever you go in the room. You’re glad this femme fatale is tethered to her mirror (getting a woman to bipedal around in high heels is still beyond the reach of robotics, as it’s almost beyond the reach of flesh and blood) because if she were free to approach as she pleased, you’d have to take off running. (Note that perfect facial expressions are also beyond robotics, and Wolfson hides that fact by giving his figure a mask.)

Should most of the credit for this piece go to the engineers rather than the artist? Is it just a way-cool piece of tech? Sure – but remember that once upon a time, perspective was “just” a new technology, as were oil paints, but the first examples of their use count as landmark works of art.

I am also perfectly aware of the real and vital feminist issues that our android raises, and her ties to the cheesiest traditions of bad SciFi. But I’m afraid that I can’t keep all that in mind once her hips start swiveling. (Courtesy Jordan Wolfson, David Zwirner, New York, and Sadie Coles HQ, London)

The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

[video]

“Tracey Enim has the best smirk in christendom.” — (via ringtales)

[video]

Apr 16

confessionsofamichaelstipe:

CONFESSIONSOFAMICHAELSTIPE.TUMBLR.COM HAS JUST REACHED 175,000 FOLLOWERS.  I WANT TO SAY THANK YOU!! WITH MY HOMAGE TO THE VELVET UNDERGROUND, ANDY WARHOL, AND MARCEL DUCHAMP.  THIS IS MUCH BETTER THAN TOILET PAPER MAGAZINE.  —MICHAEL STIPE   4.15.2014 

confessionsofamichaelstipe:

CONFESSIONSOFAMICHAELSTIPE.TUMBLR.COM HAS JUST REACHED 175,000 FOLLOWERS.  I WANT TO SAY THANK YOU!! WITH MY HOMAGE TO THE VELVET UNDERGROUND, ANDY WARHOL, AND MARCEL DUCHAMP.  THIS IS MUCH BETTER THAN TOILET PAPER MAGAZINE.  —MICHAEL STIPE   4.15.2014 

Apr 15

vuls:

David Annesley, Swing Low, 1964


1964! Eat that, Memphis!

vuls:

David Annesley, Swing Low, 1964

1964! Eat that, Memphis!

(via andren)

Apr 14

newyorker:

Every day on our home page, we share a cartoon based on the day’s events. Today’s cartoon by Mick Stevens: http://nyr.kr/1eAHYPt

newyorker:

Every day on our home page, we share a cartoon based on the day’s events. Today’s cartoon by Mick Stevens: http://nyr.kr/1eAHYPt

(Source: newyorker.com)

[video]

Apr 12

Say, What? | David Wiesner: All those cut out images sandwiched between the panes of glass mean something. Those items are a symbolic representation of a set of ideas Duchamp devised. Here is the glossary, if you will, that decodes the images:

Say, What? | David Wiesner: All those cut out images sandwiched between the panes of glass mean something. Those items are a symbolic representation of a set of ideas Duchamp devised. Here is the glossary, if you will, that decodes the images:

The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass) -Marcel Duchamp at the Philadelphia Museum of Art

The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass) -Marcel Duchamp at the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Marcel Duchamp - The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass) La Mariée mise à nu par ses célibataires, même (1915-23), reconstruction by Richard Hamilton 1965-6, lower panel remade 1985 (via Tate)

Marcel Duchamp - The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass) La Mariée mise à nu par ses célibataires, même (1915-23), reconstruction by Richard Hamilton 1965-6, lower panel remade 1985 (via Tate)

itscontemporary:

Kendell Geers - Stripped Bare(2009)
 Glass and steel 277 x 175 x 79 cm 109 (x 68 7/8 x 31 inches.

itscontemporary:

Kendell Geers - Stripped Bare(2009)

Glass and steel 277 x 175 x 79 cm 109 (x 68 7/8 x 31 inches.

(via amberdelange)

Apr 11

[video]

“As he explained to Jay Leno, the idea of taking up painting comes from Bush’s fantasy of being, or being compared to, Winston Churchill. Churchill painted. Of course, Hitler also painted.” — Art of the Bush School is a great critical essay into the Bush paintings on greg.org. More intelligent and poignant than the quote would suggest.

Apr 09

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC:  This is a still from a video by Vivian Vivian Qin, a graduate student in fine art at Columbia University, who is showing it in the first-year MFA exhibition that her program is now hosting in the university’s Wallach Art Gallery, directed by Deborah Cullen. (Click on the still to watch a clip.) For the exhibition’s opening, Qin organized a live debate on whether contemporary art will still exist in 2020, with two experienced – but non-artsie – debaters arguing the two sides of the case. What struck me most about this witty piece is how it makes clear just how foreign many of the art world’s ideas are to non-insiders. (No one in the art world could think that contemporary art would disappear that fast; no insider would make the arguments the debaters did.) Qin’s debate had the appearance of embracing people from outside fine art, but in fact made clear that deep immersion is required to play all the art world’s best games. It also hinted that debate and discussion may be where all of our best art actually comes to life – so why not skip the art and go straight to the argument? (Up next, a debate on whether Qin’s debate is art.)

The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

what a great idea!

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC:  This is a still from a video by Vivian Vivian Qin, a graduate student in fine art at Columbia University, who is showing it in the first-year MFA exhibition that her program is now hosting in the university’s Wallach Art Gallery, directed by Deborah Cullen. (Click on the still to watch a clip.) For the exhibition’s opening, Qin organized a live debate on whether contemporary art will still exist in 2020, with two experienced – but non-artsie – debaters arguing the two sides of the case. What struck me most about this witty piece is how it makes clear just how foreign many of the art world’s ideas are to non-insiders. (No one in the art world could think that contemporary art would disappear that fast; no insider would make the arguments the debaters did.) Qin’s debate had the appearance of embracing people from outside fine art, but in fact made clear that deep immersion is required to play all the art world’s best games. It also hinted that debate and discussion may be where all of our best art actually comes to life – so why not skip the art and go straight to the argument? (Up next, a debate on whether Qin’s debate is art.)

The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

what a great idea!