regardintemporel:

Arnold Eagle - Fernand Léger on Hans Richter’s “Dreams That Money Can Buy” Set, 1944

regardintemporel:

Arnold Eagle - Fernand Léger on Hans Richter’s “Dreams That Money Can Buy” Set, 1944

letmypeopleshow:

The Devil Never Even Lived in James Siena’s Mesmerizing Typewriter Palindrome Drawings
The artist James Siena has long collected antique typewriters. One day last year, he started typing his art. 
With the delicate precision of a concert pianist, he tapped out letters, numbers, and punctuation in colored ink to produce eye-teasing abstractions. 
This being James Siena, he had a system, so each of his cryptic texts came out reading the the same way forward and back. Reminiscent of medieval micrography, these delirious palindromes illuminate the interior poetry of math. 
They’re on view for the first time in a new show at Sargent’s Daughters, which pairs them with Orly Genger’s madcap drawings of abstracted superhero limbs.


wow letmypeopleshow:

The Devil Never Even Lived in James Siena’s Mesmerizing Typewriter Palindrome Drawings
The artist James Siena has long collected antique typewriters. One day last year, he started typing his art. 
With the delicate precision of a concert pianist, he tapped out letters, numbers, and punctuation in colored ink to produce eye-teasing abstractions. 
This being James Siena, he had a system, so each of his cryptic texts came out reading the the same way forward and back. Reminiscent of medieval micrography, these delirious palindromes illuminate the interior poetry of math. 
They’re on view for the first time in a new show at Sargent’s Daughters, which pairs them with Orly Genger’s madcap drawings of abstracted superhero limbs.


wow letmypeopleshow:

The Devil Never Even Lived in James Siena’s Mesmerizing Typewriter Palindrome Drawings
The artist James Siena has long collected antique typewriters. One day last year, he started typing his art. 
With the delicate precision of a concert pianist, he tapped out letters, numbers, and punctuation in colored ink to produce eye-teasing abstractions. 
This being James Siena, he had a system, so each of his cryptic texts came out reading the the same way forward and back. Reminiscent of medieval micrography, these delirious palindromes illuminate the interior poetry of math. 
They’re on view for the first time in a new show at Sargent’s Daughters, which pairs them with Orly Genger’s madcap drawings of abstracted superhero limbs.


wow letmypeopleshow:

The Devil Never Even Lived in James Siena’s Mesmerizing Typewriter Palindrome Drawings
The artist James Siena has long collected antique typewriters. One day last year, he started typing his art. 
With the delicate precision of a concert pianist, he tapped out letters, numbers, and punctuation in colored ink to produce eye-teasing abstractions. 
This being James Siena, he had a system, so each of his cryptic texts came out reading the the same way forward and back. Reminiscent of medieval micrography, these delirious palindromes illuminate the interior poetry of math. 
They’re on view for the first time in a new show at Sargent’s Daughters, which pairs them with Orly Genger’s madcap drawings of abstracted superhero limbs.


wow letmypeopleshow:

The Devil Never Even Lived in James Siena’s Mesmerizing Typewriter Palindrome Drawings
The artist James Siena has long collected antique typewriters. One day last year, he started typing his art. 
With the delicate precision of a concert pianist, he tapped out letters, numbers, and punctuation in colored ink to produce eye-teasing abstractions. 
This being James Siena, he had a system, so each of his cryptic texts came out reading the the same way forward and back. Reminiscent of medieval micrography, these delirious palindromes illuminate the interior poetry of math. 
They’re on view for the first time in a new show at Sargent’s Daughters, which pairs them with Orly Genger’s madcap drawings of abstracted superhero limbs.


wow

letmypeopleshow:

The Devil Never Even Lived in James Siena’s Mesmerizing Typewriter Palindrome Drawings

The artist James Siena has long collected antique typewriters. One day last year, he started typing his art. 

With the delicate precision of a concert pianist, he tapped out letters, numbers, and punctuation in colored ink to produce eye-teasing abstractions.

This being James Siena, he had a system, so each of his cryptic texts came out reading the the same way forward and back. Reminiscent of medieval micrography, these delirious palindromes illuminate the interior poetry of math. 

They’re on view for the first time in a new show at Sargent’s Daughters, which pairs them with Orly Genger’s madcap drawings of abstracted superhero limbs.

wow

less-ismore:

Jeff Koons, by Ari Marcopoulos,1987.

  1. Camera: IF ,,
  2. Aperture: f/1.5172236068983
  3. Exposure: 1.2340986733596"
  4. Focal Length: 1mm

archiveofaffinities:

Tony Cragg, Three Modern Buildings, 1984

amazing

fyeahwomenartists:

Amanda Valdez
I Poison Myself, 2012

  1. Camera: Canon EOS 5D Mark II
  2. Aperture: f/5
  3. Exposure: 1/125th
  4. Focal Length: 100mm

Self Portrait of Robert Rauchenberg.

(Source: inneroptics)

mentaltimetraveller:

Heather Guertin

The longer I look at it the more impressive it becomes.

'Untitled' (ArtEverywhereUS) by greg allen

everyartisthasabday:

This is Sol LeWitt’s only 3D Wall Drawing. The story goes that he was invited to exhibit in Japan, but when he arrived, he was given 4 pegboard walls that he couldn’t alter. Typically he paints over a wall, so he had to come up with a new idea idea on the spot. That new idea was rolling 40,000 pieces of tissue paper and inserting them into the pegboard’s holes.

(Wall Drawing 38, 1970)

  1. Camera: LG Electronics VX-8550

mentaltimetraveller:

CHRISTOPHER WOOL

UNTITLED

mentaltimetraveller:

JOSE DÁVILA HOMAGE TO THE SQUARE, 2011

QuestionJust to let you know, the suspected Franz Klein is actually a Kazuo Shiraga. Most likely installed at the Fortuny museum in Venice. Answer

Thanks a lot! I had trouble finding the source, I’ll add your remark to the post! 

Is that a Franz Kline or a home made painting? Does it matter? 

augustcanary remarked:

Just to let you know, the suspected Franz Klein is actually a Kazuo Shiraga. Most likely installed at the Fortuny museum in Venice.


Thanks!

Here is more Kazuo Shiraga goodness.

Is that a Franz Kline or a home made painting? Does it matter? augustcanary remarked:

Just to let you know, the suspected Franz Klein is actually a Kazuo Shiraga. Most likely installed at the Fortuny museum in Venice.
Thanks! Here is more Kazuo Shiraga goodness.

(Source: research-development)

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC: The previous item in my once-a-week Koons-O-Rama looked at a racially-tinged ad that Jeff Koons appropriated, almost unchanged, into the world of 1980s high art. This week, here’s another ad where he’s done the same–sort of. (Click on my image to enlarge it.) The difference is that my earlier example is all ad, all the time; the only thing about it that says “art” is the fact that it was printed on canvas, and that it is hanging in the Whitney Museum in New York. This week, my image is still 100-per-cent ad: It really was designed by a bunch of advertising creatives, with the single goal of selling Nike shoes. But it also happens to look very, very much like late-1980s and early-90s art. Its juxtaposition of image and printed title reminds me of conceptual photos by Lynne Cohen and Lorna Simpson. The way it pairs professional sports and corporate culture, and underlines the racial dynamic in that pairing, could come straight from any of the most political artists of its era. Hans Haacke, anyone? And yet the ad is supposed to be–really was–an object in the thick of pop culture

Is the similarity just accidental, or did the ad’s original designers, probably trained in art school, know and admire the avant-garde and want to borrow from it? That would be as though Campbell’s, in 1962, had started to corrupt the type on their tomato-soup cans to make them look more like Warhols. Whatever the ad’s true genesis, Koons clearly spotted what looked like a feedback loop between high and low culture, complicating both. He then inserted himself into that loop. Warhol had always aspired to being a fine artist; he was surprised when his unsaleably radical art launched him into mass culture. Koons, Andy’s most notable heir, gave finding a place in pop culture–or pretending to find such a place–a central role in his high art. (JPMorgan Chase Art Collection, ©Jeff Koons)

The Daily Pic also appears at ArtnetNews.com. For a full survey of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.