thefilearts:

The File Arts presents:
The Darkness
by James Proctor

While pitch perfect black is easy to achieve in a digital image, it does not really communicate the effect of darkness. This digitally generated image by James does.

The edition contains:
- Full size image 2400 x 3000 px
- Full size alternate image
- Animated gif alternates
- Source code
- PDF with background
- Certificate Of Authenticity

And all that for $5,- Buy here.

Check out James Proctor on Tumblr

The File Arts presents:
Nightwatch
by Astrid Hermes

This is the most unfortunate way you could photograph the Night Watch.

This is not a very technically perfect photo. The flash is glaring, the composition distorts and crops and skews the subject.

This Rembrandt is shot like it’s leaving a nightclub, caught in the glare of a flash. A desecration of the canonical image.

You know how the Night Watch looks; it’s famous and available in intricate detail and very high resolution online.

This is not a photograph of the Nightwatch…

The edition contains the original full resolution 3106 x 2070 pixel image and photoshop file by Astrid Hermes and a PDF with the images, background information and related images. The original high resolution image of the Nightwatch by Rembrandt from the Rijksmuseum is included in this edition for reference. Buy at The File Arts for $20,-

  1. Camera: Panasonic DMC-GF1
  2. Aperture: f/1.7
  3. Exposure: 1/60th
  4. Focal Length: 20mm

The File Arts presents:
[ F T O H R E ]
by Marqui

Sometimes when you see a image it suggests a whole world. This was the effect when I saw this picture. it’s like an artefact from an ancient civilisation…read more »

Check out [ F T O H R E ] on The File Arts

christopherschreck:

Ellsworth Kelly, “White Diagonal II,” (2008)


2008! “Fuck trends and fashion, I’ll do what I like”. And I think it’s great!

christopherschreck:

Ellsworth Kelly, “White Diagonal II,” (2008)

2008! “Fuck trends and fashion, I’ll do what I like”. And I think it’s great!

thefilearts:

The File Arts presents:
Fra[mes]: Adoration of the Magi
by Taylor Holland

It looks like a photoshop-content-aware-fill filter gone awry. But it is in fact a funny and skilled reflection on craftsmanship and ornament and the aura of the physical work.

Read more at The File Arts »

The download contains: the highest resolution TIF image of ‘Adoration of the Magi’ (2901 x 3711 px) and a catalogue showing process pictures of the creation of the physical versions of the filled frames.

Buy at The File Arts for $20,- get a digital signed certificate of authenticity and support the creation of the physical versions of the work.

thefilearts:

The File Arts presents:Epidermisby Douglas D. Prince

The nude is a canonical subject in classical art. The internet is notorious for pornography. Epidermis is Latin for skin, and manages to create high art out of pornographic source material by literally skimming the surface; the images are made from parts of other images that show only skin. This still makes for some uncomfortable viewing…

The download contains 3 JPG images from the series Epidermis at their full resolution, wallpapers for desktop and iOS of the images and a PDF with background information on the images, the process and the artist. This edition is on offer for $15,- for the first week. After thursday 26th April 2013 it will be $20,- So Buy now…
Check out and follow Douglas Prince on Tumblr

wow thefilearts:

The File Arts presents:Epidermisby Douglas D. Prince

The nude is a canonical subject in classical art. The internet is notorious for pornography. Epidermis is Latin for skin, and manages to create high art out of pornographic source material by literally skimming the surface; the images are made from parts of other images that show only skin. This still makes for some uncomfortable viewing…

The download contains 3 JPG images from the series Epidermis at their full resolution, wallpapers for desktop and iOS of the images and a PDF with background information on the images, the process and the artist. This edition is on offer for $15,- for the first week. After thursday 26th April 2013 it will be $20,- So Buy now…
Check out and follow Douglas Prince on Tumblr

wow thefilearts:

The File Arts presents:Epidermisby Douglas D. Prince

The nude is a canonical subject in classical art. The internet is notorious for pornography. Epidermis is Latin for skin, and manages to create high art out of pornographic source material by literally skimming the surface; the images are made from parts of other images that show only skin. This still makes for some uncomfortable viewing…

The download contains 3 JPG images from the series Epidermis at their full resolution, wallpapers for desktop and iOS of the images and a PDF with background information on the images, the process and the artist. This edition is on offer for $15,- for the first week. After thursday 26th April 2013 it will be $20,- So Buy now…
Check out and follow Douglas Prince on Tumblr

wow

thefilearts:

The File Arts presents:
Epidermis
by Douglas D. Prince

The nude is a canonical subject in classical art. The internet is notorious for pornography. Epidermis is Latin for skin, and manages to create high art out of pornographic source material by literally skimming the surface; the images are made from parts of other images that show only skin. This still makes for some uncomfortable viewing…

The download contains 3 JPG images from the series Epidermis at their full resolution, wallpapers for desktop and iOS of the images and a PDF with background information on the images, the process and the artist. This edition is on offer for $15,- for the first week. After thursday 26th April 2013 it will be $20,- So Buy now

Check out and follow Douglas Prince on Tumblr

wow

thefilearts:

The File Arts presents:
Double your money
by Daniel Silvo

The Spanish title for this work ‘Como Doblar Tu Dinero’ can be translated as ‘How to fold your money’. But ‘to fold’ also means ‘going bankrupt’ in financial terms. A better translation would be ‘How to double your money’, for these works aim to add some extra beauty and personal craftiness to money, making it worth more, even if only more personal and emotive.

Daniel Silvo likes using common every day objects to create art. Or in this case lets you create art. The value of the art you make is immediate and guaranteed; you can still use it as money. And you should; folding your money is a way to add a layer of attention and connection; pay with it and change the nature of the transaction.

This work is not so much a digital artwork as it is a digital set of instructions on how to create the art yourself. In a way this is a very primitive form of 3D printing; you transfer the instructions to another place, grab some basic material and apply the instructions / the code and voila; art; it even looks a bit like a 3D shaded shape.

I like the fact the models are all birds; signifying the fleetingness of the value of money, and the aspiration of art to make your mind fly.

The download contains 4 instructions for 4 Euro bills (also applicable to Dollar bills). This edition is on offer for $10,- for the first week. After thursday 14th March it will be $20,- So Buy now

thefilearts:

All works by Lauren Helena May Pelc-McArthur. The bottom one is Grey Pause Morning Sitter; available as a digital high resolution download, including layered and 3D source files, at The File Arts. 

Today is the last day you can get this edition for $10,- thefilearts:

All works by Lauren Helena May Pelc-McArthur. The bottom one is Grey Pause Morning Sitter; available as a digital high resolution download, including layered and 3D source files, at The File Arts. 

Today is the last day you can get this edition for $10,-

thefilearts:

All works by Lauren Helena May Pelc-McArthur. The bottom one is Grey Pause Morning Sitter; available as a digital high resolution download, including layered and 3D source files, at The File Arts.

Today is the last day you can get this edition for $10,-

thefilearts:

The File Arts presents:
Grey Pause Morning Sitter
by Lauren Helena May Pelc-McArthur

I love it when I cannot immediately see how an image was build.
Grey Pause Morning Sitter definitely is not easy to pick apart.

Lauren Helena May Pelc-McArthur mixes paint and digital, representation and abstract art. Painted textures are scanned in, used as 3D textures, combined with brushes in Photoshop and this all combines to a vibrant image. From up close the picture seems to boil with energy, from a little distance a figure emerges. Read on

This edition has an ‘early bird’ special price of $10,- for the first week only! After that the regular price will be $20,-. So you should buy now

Check out Lauren’s website and tumblr

Download Grey Pause Morning Sitter by Lauren Helena May Pelc-McArthur on The File Arts

I was so happy to have discovered Lauren’s work; it is exquisite. You should see the details at 100%. Follow The File Arts tumblr on which I will post some details in the coming week.

thefilearts:

The File Arts presents:
SQUARE
by Daniel Silvo

When Daniel Silvo first send me Square, I thought there was nothing there. Much like you expected to see something above, but it seems just empty space. I thought he forgot the attachment. Then I double clicked some space in the mail, it opened and it looked like an empty document. It took me several conceptual steps and moments of exciting discovery to see what exactly he had made and send me.

I loved that journey — experience it for yourself; click buy immediately and download and explore SQUARE. Or read my description of the edition if you want to know exacty what you will be getting before you download.

Daniel Silvo works in a wide range of media, from video and photography to installation, drawing and sculpture. More important than the medium is the critical investigation into what is or can be communicated: interferences in verbal and visual communication is a recurring theme in his work. He approaches abstract, philosophical and theoretical subjects with a great sense of humour.

This edition has a fixed price of $5,- The download includes two PDFs: the work and a booklet with background information on the artist.

Download Square by Daniel Silvo on The File Arts

thefilearts:

The File Arts presents:
Moment / Tramcar
by Mareen Fischinger

This photograph can be your action-movie of tonight: a man in a tramcar points a gun at the other passengers: a whole crowd held at gunpoint.

Between these people there are so many reactions; so many ways the story could unfold; I cannot help but think of all these people involved. Each with their own lives, as full and complex as mine, getting together to act out this scene. Each of them acting out a violent and traumatic experience, reflecting on how they would react; making us think of how we would hold ourselves. Imagining how the story will unfold.

Read the full description on The File Arts »

Tramcar is the third in the series Moment by Mareen Fischinger; an award-winning photographer for advertising campaigns and corporate communication. She explores experimental technical and conceptual possibilities of photography in her fine arts series. Parking garage and Bedroom from her series »Moment« are also available as digital editions via The File Arts.

This edition has a fixed price of $15,- The download includes: the highest resolution of the image available, the PSD source file (1.02GB) showing all adjustments and layers and several wallpaper sized versions. The PDF contains ‘making of’ photos, sketches and a thesis on staged photography.

Download Moment / Tramcar by Mareen Fischinger on The File Arts

I recently started The File Arts and am very proud and constantly want to show off the awesome editions we have available for download. So I am inclined to reblog all the announcements I make there to here, sympathyfortheartgallery. If you all go and follow The File Arts on Tumblr I promise I won’t spam you with these posts here on sympathyfortheartgallery again! Go follow!

  1. Camera: Hasselblad H3D II-50
  2. Aperture: f/9.5
  3. Exposure: 1/125th
  4. Focal Length: 35mm
adamferriss:

Simeis 147: Pixel sorting algorithm comparison.

Kim Asendorf recently released his pixel sorting code. This was incredibly exciting for me because his images were the inspiration for my own venture down the pixel sorting road. 

I decided to run an image of Simeis 147 (a supernova remnant) through both pieces of code to compare the outputs and highlight the differences and similarities between them. The output from my code is on top, Kim’s is on the bottom. 

The code that I wrote only sorts in one direction at a time, right to left, from bright to dark. If I want the lines to appear vertically I have to feed the image into the algorithm rotated 90degrees. Kim’s will sort both vertically and horizontally at the same time, but for reasons that I don’t yet understand, the horizontal sorts are more prominent. 

My code also runs on whats known as the quick sort algorithm. When I want to move certain pixels, I tell my code to grab a range of values determined by brightness, rgb, saturation, or hue and plug them into the quick sort. Quick sort divides up the array into tiny pieces so that the computer can manage them more efficiently. This is very important. Even with an image that is only 1280x850 pixels, that ends up being over a million individual pixels to rearrange. The image I sorted for the File Arts was roughly 7000x3000 pixels, which ends up at a staggering 21 million.

As far as I can tell, Kim’s is running on a sorting method that he constructed himself. 

If I understand it right, it will sort from the first not-black value if finds in a row or column until it reaches a user-set black value. Then it moves on in the same row/column to find a value that is less than a user-set brightness value, and sort that pixel until it encounters the threshold. Finally it will search for the first not-white value and sort that until it reaches the white value set by the user.

I tried to grab a set of similar values using both pieces of code; I think the results are remarkably similar. It’s also interesting to see how two different approaches can yield similar yet minutely different outcomes. Isn’t code great?!

If you’d like to see a copy of my code and read a bit more about my process, it’s now available (along with the aforementioned 21million pixel image) for just $5 over at The File Arts. http://www.thefilearts.com

Kim Asendorf’s code can be found herehttp://kimasendorf.tumblr.com/post/32936480093/processing-source-code adamferriss:

Simeis 147: Pixel sorting algorithm comparison.

Kim Asendorf recently released his pixel sorting code. This was incredibly exciting for me because his images were the inspiration for my own venture down the pixel sorting road. 

I decided to run an image of Simeis 147 (a supernova remnant) through both pieces of code to compare the outputs and highlight the differences and similarities between them. The output from my code is on top, Kim’s is on the bottom. 

The code that I wrote only sorts in one direction at a time, right to left, from bright to dark. If I want the lines to appear vertically I have to feed the image into the algorithm rotated 90degrees. Kim’s will sort both vertically and horizontally at the same time, but for reasons that I don’t yet understand, the horizontal sorts are more prominent. 

My code also runs on whats known as the quick sort algorithm. When I want to move certain pixels, I tell my code to grab a range of values determined by brightness, rgb, saturation, or hue and plug them into the quick sort. Quick sort divides up the array into tiny pieces so that the computer can manage them more efficiently. This is very important. Even with an image that is only 1280x850 pixels, that ends up being over a million individual pixels to rearrange. The image I sorted for the File Arts was roughly 7000x3000 pixels, which ends up at a staggering 21 million.

As far as I can tell, Kim’s is running on a sorting method that he constructed himself. 

If I understand it right, it will sort from the first not-black value if finds in a row or column until it reaches a user-set black value. Then it moves on in the same row/column to find a value that is less than a user-set brightness value, and sort that pixel until it encounters the threshold. Finally it will search for the first not-white value and sort that until it reaches the white value set by the user.

I tried to grab a set of similar values using both pieces of code; I think the results are remarkably similar. It’s also interesting to see how two different approaches can yield similar yet minutely different outcomes. Isn’t code great?!

If you’d like to see a copy of my code and read a bit more about my process, it’s now available (along with the aforementioned 21million pixel image) for just $5 over at The File Arts. http://www.thefilearts.com

Kim Asendorf’s code can be found herehttp://kimasendorf.tumblr.com/post/32936480093/processing-source-code

adamferriss:

Simeis 147: Pixel sorting algorithm comparison.

Kim Asendorf recently released his pixel sorting code. This was incredibly exciting for me because his images were the inspiration for my own venture down the pixel sorting road.

I decided to run an image of Simeis 147 (a supernova remnant) through both pieces of code to compare the outputs and highlight the differences and similarities between them. The output from my code is on top, Kim’s is on the bottom.

The code that I wrote only sorts in one direction at a time, right to left, from bright to dark. If I want the lines to appear vertically I have to feed the image into the algorithm rotated 90degrees. Kim’s will sort both vertically and horizontally at the same time, but for reasons that I don’t yet understand, the horizontal sorts are more prominent.

My code also runs on whats known as the quick sort algorithm. When I want to move certain pixels, I tell my code to grab a range of values determined by brightness, rgb, saturation, or hue and plug them into the quick sort. Quick sort divides up the array into tiny pieces so that the computer can manage them more efficiently. This is very important. Even with an image that is only 1280x850 pixels, that ends up being over a million individual pixels to rearrange. The image I sorted for the File Arts was roughly 7000x3000 pixels, which ends up at a staggering 21 million.

As far as I can tell, Kim’s is running on a sorting method that he constructed himself.

If I understand it right, it will sort from the first not-black value if finds in a row or column until it reaches a user-set black value. Then it moves on in the same row/column to find a value that is less than a user-set brightness value, and sort that pixel until it encounters the threshold. Finally it will search for the first not-white value and sort that until it reaches the white value set by the user.

I tried to grab a set of similar values using both pieces of code; I think the results are remarkably similar. It’s also interesting to see how two different approaches can yield similar yet minutely different outcomes. Isn’t code great?!

If you’d like to see a copy of my code and read a bit more about my process, it’s now available (along with the aforementioned 21million pixel image) for just $5 over at The File Arts. http://www.thefilearts.com

Kim Asendorf’s code can be found here
http://kimasendorf.tumblr.com/post/32936480093/processing-source-code

The File Arts presents:
Star forming region NGC 3324
by Adam Ferriss

The images that science produces of natural and scientific phenomenon are truly awe inspiring. Adam Ferriss takes astronomy pictures and puts them through a quicksort algorithm, adjusting values and repeating the process, until the desired result has been achieved. He uses mathematics to make art from science, adding a sense of bedazzlement and ambiguity to the source material. Read the edition description on The File Arts for more art vs science.

Now available in extreme HD; the image is 3034 x 7748 and would not fit on this Tumblr post as one image. You really have to see it at full resolution to admire the intricacy and detail of the picture. And to get lost in this galaxy of shifting stars.

This edition is priced at the popular and affordable amount of $5,-. For this you get the full download, containing: the final rendered file of 3034 x 7748 pixels and the edited PSD file. The accompanying PDF illustrates the process and the code used to make the piece. And even the source code and the original source images from NASA are included.

Download Star forming region NGC 3324 by Adam Ferriss on The File Arts

Top: Passing through Times Square by Mareen Fischinger
Bottom: Moment / Bedroom by Mareen Fischinger

Most Tumblr users are familiar with the work of Mareen Fischinger, if only because she has provided the standard Tumblr demo photo ‘passing through times square’. Seeing it again I marvel at how diverse her talent is, and how different the superpolished and sharp editions for The File Arts are from the impressionistic NY shot. 

You can own an art edition by Mareen:Download Parking garage on The File Arts. Top: Passing through Times Square by Mareen Fischinger
Bottom: Moment / Bedroom by Mareen Fischinger

Most Tumblr users are familiar with the work of Mareen Fischinger, if only because she has provided the standard Tumblr demo photo ‘passing through times square’. Seeing it again I marvel at how diverse her talent is, and how different the superpolished and sharp editions for The File Arts are from the impressionistic NY shot. 

You can own an art edition by Mareen:Download Parking garage on The File Arts.

Top: Passing through Times Square by Mareen Fischinger
Bottom: Moment / Bedroom by Mareen Fischinger

Most Tumblr users are familiar with the work of Mareen Fischinger, if only because she has provided the standard Tumblr demo photo ‘passing through times square’. Seeing it again I marvel at how diverse her talent is, and how different the superpolished and sharp editions for The File Arts are from the impressionistic NY shot.

You can own an art edition by Mareen:
Download Parking garage on The File Arts.

Photography tells a story in one still moment, the story unfolding as your eyes travel the image. A woman in a parking garage in front of a luxury car looks alarmed at a fast approaching man. You have to look close to see what is happening here…

Parking garage is the second in the series Moment by Mareen Fischinger; an award-winning photographer for advertising campaigns and corporate communication. She explores experimental technical and conceptual possibilities of photography in her fine arts series. Parking garage and Bedroom from her series »Moment« are both available as digital editions via The File Arts.

						This edition has a fixed price of $15,- The download includes: the highest resolution of the image available, the PSD source file (1.08GB) showing all adjustments and layers and several wallpaper sized versions. The PDF contains ‘making of’ photos, sketches and a thesis on staged photography.


						Download Moment / Parking garage by Mareen Fischinger on The File Arts  Photography tells a story in one still moment, the story unfolding as your eyes travel the image. A woman in a parking garage in front of a luxury car looks alarmed at a fast approaching man. You have to look close to see what is happening here…

Parking garage is the second in the series Moment by Mareen Fischinger; an award-winning photographer for advertising campaigns and corporate communication. She explores experimental technical and conceptual possibilities of photography in her fine arts series. Parking garage and Bedroom from her series »Moment« are both available as digital editions via The File Arts.

						This edition has a fixed price of $15,- The download includes: the highest resolution of the image available, the PSD source file (1.08GB) showing all adjustments and layers and several wallpaper sized versions. The PDF contains ‘making of’ photos, sketches and a thesis on staged photography.


						Download Moment / Parking garage by Mareen Fischinger on The File Arts

Photography tells a story in one still moment, the story unfolding as your eyes travel the image. A woman in a parking garage in front of a luxury car looks alarmed at a fast approaching man. You have to look close to see what is happening here…

Parking garage is the second in the series Moment by Mareen Fischinger; an award-winning photographer for advertising campaigns and corporate communication. She explores experimental technical and conceptual possibilities of photography in her fine arts series. Parking garage and Bedroom from her series »Moment« are both available as digital editions via The File Arts.

This edition has a fixed price of $15,- The download includes: the highest resolution of the image available, the PSD source file (1.08GB) showing all adjustments and layers and several wallpaper sized versions. The PDF contains ‘making of’ photos, sketches and a thesis on staged photography.

Download Moment / Parking garage by Mareen Fischinger on The File Arts