thefilearts:

The File Arts presents:
Double your money
by Daniel Silvo

The Spanish title for this work ‘Como Doblar Tu Dinero’ can be translated as ‘How to fold your money’. But ‘to fold’ also means ‘going bankrupt’ in financial terms. A better translation would be ‘How to double your money’, for these works aim to add some extra beauty and personal craftiness to money, making it worth more, even if only more personal and emotive.

Daniel Silvo likes using common every day objects to create art. Or in this case lets you create art. The value of the art you make is immediate and guaranteed; you can still use it as money. And you should; folding your money is a way to add a layer of attention and connection; pay with it and change the nature of the transaction.

This work is not so much a digital artwork as it is a digital set of instructions on how to create the art yourself. In a way this is a very primitive form of 3D printing; you transfer the instructions to another place, grab some basic material and apply the instructions / the code and voila; art; it even looks a bit like a 3D shaded shape.

I like the fact the models are all birds; signifying the fleetingness of the value of money, and the aspiration of art to make your mind fly.

The download contains 4 instructions for 4 Euro bills (also applicable to Dollar bills). This edition is on offer for $10,- for the first week. After thursday 14th March it will be $20,- So Buy now

thefilearts:

Top: Kasimir Malevich, Suprematist Composition: White on White, 1918
Bottom: Daniel Silvo, SQUARE, 2012
from the MOMA website  on White on White:

A white square floating weightlessly in a white field, Suprematist Composition: White on White was one of the most radical paintings of its day: a geometric abstraction without reference to external reality. Yet the picture is not impersonal: we see the artist’s hand in the texture of the paint, and in the subtle variations of the whites. The square is not exactly symmetrical, and its lines, imprecisely ruled, have a breathing quality, generating a feeling not of borders defining a shape but of a space without limits.
After the Revolution, Russian intellectuals hoped that human reason and modern technology would engineer a perfect society. Malevich was fascinated with technology, and particularly with the airplane, instrument of the human yearning to break the bounds of earth. He studied aerial photography, and wanted White on White to create a sense of floating and transcendence. White was for Malevich the color of infinity, and signified a realm of higher feeling.
For Malevich, that realm, a utopian world of pure form, was attainable only through nonobjective art. Indeed, he named his theory of art Suprematism to signify “the supremacy of pure feeling or perception in the pictorial arts”; and pure perception demanded that a picture’s forms “have nothing in common with nature.” Malevich imagined Suprematism as a universal language that would free viewers from the material world.


Daniel Silvo took this painting by Malevich as inspiration for his digital work SQUARE: here the piece is taken to its ultimate digital conclusion; the white on white is not visible. It has become pure language,  completely separated from the material world, from any sort of representation. That is until the viewer takes an action, in this case selects the text, and makes, for that brief moment of interaction, visible the white square from the white background, reintroducing the human scale into the work.

Download Square by Daniel Silvo on The File Arts

thefilearts:

Top: Kasimir Malevich, Suprematist Composition: White on White, 1918

Bottom: Daniel Silvo, SQUARE, 2012

from the MOMA website on White on White:

A white square floating weightlessly in a white field, Suprematist Composition: White on White was one of the most radical paintings of its day: a geometric abstraction without reference to external reality. Yet the picture is not impersonal: we see the artist’s hand in the texture of the paint, and in the subtle variations of the whites. The square is not exactly symmetrical, and its lines, imprecisely ruled, have a breathing quality, generating a feeling not of borders defining a shape but of a space without limits.

After the Revolution, Russian intellectuals hoped that human reason and modern technology would engineer a perfect society. Malevich was fascinated with technology, and particularly with the airplane, instrument of the human yearning to break the bounds of earth. He studied aerial photography, and wanted White on White to create a sense of floating and transcendence. White was for Malevich the color of infinity, and signified a realm of higher feeling.

For Malevich, that realm, a utopian world of pure form, was attainable only through nonobjective art. Indeed, he named his theory of art Suprematism to signify “the supremacy of pure feeling or perception in the pictorial arts”; and pure perception demanded that a picture’s forms “have nothing in common with nature.” Malevich imagined Suprematism as a universal language that would free viewers from the material world.

Daniel Silvo took this painting by Malevich as inspiration for his digital work SQUARE: here the piece is taken to its ultimate digital conclusion; the white on white is not visible. It has become pure language, completely separated from the material world, from any sort of representation. That is until the viewer takes an action, in this case selects the text, and makes, for that brief moment of interaction, visible the white square from the white background, reintroducing the human scale into the work.

Download Square by Daniel Silvo on The File Arts

thefilearts:

The File Arts presents:
SQUARE
by Daniel Silvo

When Daniel Silvo first send me Square, I thought there was nothing there. Much like you expected to see something above, but it seems just empty space. I thought he forgot the attachment. Then I double clicked some space in the mail, it opened and it looked like an empty document. It took me several conceptual steps and moments of exciting discovery to see what exactly he had made and send me.

I loved that journey — experience it for yourself; click buy immediately and download and explore SQUARE. Or read my description of the edition if you want to know exacty what you will be getting before you download.

Daniel Silvo works in a wide range of media, from video and photography to installation, drawing and sculpture. More important than the medium is the critical investigation into what is or can be communicated: interferences in verbal and visual communication is a recurring theme in his work. He approaches abstract, philosophical and theoretical subjects with a great sense of humour.

This edition has a fixed price of $5,- The download includes two PDFs: the work and a booklet with background information on the artist.

Download Square by Daniel Silvo on The File Arts